Last time we discussed the different muscle fibre typology of world-class cyclists in different disciplines. Now lets explore what this might actually mean in terms of recovering from hard training.Track sprinters were at one end of the spectrum with high proportions of fast-twitch musclesIn my last article, we discussed a Belgian/Australian collaboration using non-invasive imaging techniques to determine the relative muscle fibre typology of world-class cyclists across disciplines (Lievens et al. 2020a). We saw that BMX and track sprinters were at one end of the spectrum with high proportions of fast-twitch muscles. Road climbers were at the opposite end with high slow-twitch composition.Overall, world-level performance seems to select for a very race-specific type of athlete. Youve no doubt seen this in action in your own circle of fellow cyclists and competitors. But beyond academic interest, how might our individual typology affect our training response?Recovery From HIITIn the first of two companion studies from the same collaboration, the impact of muscle fibre typology on recovery from high-intensity interval training was explored (Lievens et al. 2020b). If a cyclist has higher proportion of fast-twitch fibres, which are capable of high force but fatigue rapidly, might it also mean that their recovery from a hard training session take longer than a cyclist with more slow-twitch fibres?From a larger group of 32 initial participants, 10 trained cyclists with high FT typing and 10 with high ST typing were recruited.Each group performed 3×30 s Wingate sprints. A single 30 s Wingate is nasty. Rather than…
Source: Cycling – Pez Cycling