Blood its in you to give. Donating blood is a wonderful selfless act to help others. How might you need to adapt your training around your blood donation schedule?IntroductionDonating blood is something that I have been doing routinely for the past 10 years or so, especially as I apparently have a relatively rare blood type: B negative. I think donating is something that is important, as those donations can help save lives for cancer, trauma, or burn patients.However, donating blood certainly is not as easy as writing a check. No, it means giving up your hard-earned red blood cells. Dont doping athletes try to increase their red blood cell (RBC) count or erythropoietin (EPO)? After all, cycling is an aerobic sport, so isnt giving up some of your aerobic fitness counterintuitive? So, should you be donating as a casual or competitive cyclist? I hope to help answer that in this months Pez Toolbox article.What Happens When You Donate Blood?A whole-blood donation involves taking one pint (~500 mL) of blood. For most humans, this represents about 10% of your total blood volume. This means that youll be losing about 10% of your RBCs and the crucial oxygen-carrying hemoglobin within. In theory, this means forfeiting about 10% of your bodys ability to deliver oxygen to your working muscles during those hard intervals. For this reason, the Red Cross recommends avoiding strenuous activity for the first ~24 hours after donating.Immediately after donating blood, your body works hard to replenish what was lost. Just…
Source: Cycling – Pez Cycling